Fibromyalgia and Mental Health (Confession Time)

I’ve been wanting to do a post on mental health and fibromyalgia ever since I started this blog, but wasn’t sure where to start. I can say without a doubt now that there is a significant connection between the diseases, and that the one disease exacerbates the other. I don’t need to have any study to tell me that is true; just the past several years experience is enough to make me realize the connection.

Mental health has been an issue in my family. I can name multiple family members who have depression and anxiety that they have to deal with on a regular basis. I myself was hospitalized for major depression in 2002 (I told you this was confession time). However, prior to the full onset of Fibromyalgia, I was dealing with that depression very well through diet, exercise and positive coping mechanisms.

That all changed when the fibro hit.

I think the connection has a lot to do with the things you start thinking about when you have fibromyalgia; the ‘what ifs’ if you will. ‘What if what I’m doing right now is going to cause a flare up of pain?’ ‘What if this flare stops me from doing <fill in the blank>? ‘What if this flare stops me from going into work tomorrow?’ ‘ What if I get a flare up and can’t attend <insert event here>?’ ‘What if my friends get mad at me for constantly cancelling on them?’ ‘What if I can’t fulfill the tasks I volunteered for?’ These are all legitimate concerns that people with fibromyalgia have to consider.

And there are more, especially in today’s day and age where we have very few remedies open to us to help with flares. ‘What if my doctor stops giving me the low dose opioid that I take as a last resort?’ Or even, ‘What if my use of Cannabis to help my fibro gets me fired from work?’ (Yes, I live in a state that does have legal Medical Marijuana- but they also still allow people to be fired from work if they use it.)

When you suffer from fibromyalgia, ALL of these things are very possible situations you may face. You have to change your entire life to ensure that you remain as flare-free as possible. It can be done, but not without significant struggles and frustrations as the fibromyalgia flares come without warning, which makes trying to put together some semblance of a life even more precarious.

Have enough of those plausible ‘What ifs’ come in your head come true and the stressors of those situations become palpable. You will have flare ups of pain that make you take sick days, cancel plans with friends or even cancel chores you had scheduled around the house. Friends will get mad or frustrated, things you thought you could handle become overwhelming. And all of this does mess with your mental health. Even the mentally healthiest of individuals are going to start to buckle and start worrying.

And as those worries happen more and more, they turn into anxiety. Soon, you start having full blown panic attacks.

My first fibro-induced panic attack happened about 4 years ago. I did everything I could to push through it, and just keep moving. Since then, I’ve changed my supplement regime, added additional mindfulness practices, prayers, mantras, and used my German Shepherd Natasha as an emotional support animal. Those have all helped, but they are never enough.

Today, as I write this, I’m painfully reminded of how everything I do to prevent anxiety attacks is never enough. Here I am, typing out this post with another full blown panic attack brought on by a fibromyalgia flare. This flare was caused by a significant change in the weather here in the Midwest (a 20 degree increase in heat almost overnight,) and the possibility of a deep friendship with someone I cared about being torn apart because of unsolvable issues (another relationship that had some of it’s issues within the root cause of fibromyalgia).

I’m breathing deeply, made myself a drink (another last resort for me with panic attacks) and am sitting in front of the TV after working in the garden this afternoon, which also helped some. I’ll probably have to use some visualization and breathing techniques to get to sleep tonight, but I’m still pretty certain I can. If needed, I’ll ask the hubby to allow my dog on the bed for the night.

I will want to touch on this subject further, but probably won’t do it until I’m settled some. Until then, if you are reading this and going through any semblance of anxiety or depression over your Fibromyalgia, chronic disease or any other issue, just recognize you aren’t alone. I’m right in the same spot with you. And if I can breathe and push through just this one night of anxiety, you can too.

To be continued.

The Journey Begins

Hi there!

Welcome to Living a Fibro Life.

This is my second attempt at a blog to log my fibromyalgia. The first one, “A Girl Fighting Fibro,” went down a couple years ago due to multiple reasons, one being the fact that I didn’t know what the hell I was doing trying to fight Fibro in the first place, so my posts really didn’t have much substance.

Now, things are a little different. I think I’m figuring it out, at least little by little. I have more wins, but I also have more loses. But this time those losses are becoming things I can learn from and not be totally devastated by.

I’m moving forward, and I’m feeling stronger, and I think I have more to say. At the very least, my hope is that I’ll provide a space for other people to understand that although it feels like a horrible fight, and it presents lots problems, it can be managed. And maybe, just maybe, something I say here will help someone else not feel so alone, or have hope that they too can move forward. Perhaps someone may even come forward with an idea that I hadn’t thought about before, and I can learn how to better manage this diagnosis.

Either way, welcome again. I’m looking forward to seeing what comes out in this adventure.