Fibromyalgia and Mental Health (Confession Time)

I’ve been wanting to do a post on mental health and fibromyalgia ever since I started this blog, but wasn’t sure where to start. I can say without a doubt now that there is a significant connection between the diseases, and that the one disease exacerbates the other. I don’t need to have any study to tell me that is true; just the past several years experience is enough to make me realize the connection.

Mental health has been an issue in my family. I can name multiple family members who have depression and anxiety that they have to deal with on a regular basis. I myself was hospitalized for major depression in 2002 (I told you this was confession time). However, prior to the full onset of Fibromyalgia, I was dealing with that depression very well through diet, exercise and positive coping mechanisms.

That all changed when the fibro hit.

I think the connection has a lot to do with the things you start thinking about when you have fibromyalgia; the ‘what ifs’ if you will. ‘What if what I’m doing right now is going to cause a flare up of pain?’ ‘What if this flare stops me from doing <fill in the blank>? ‘What if this flare stops me from going into work tomorrow?’ ‘ What if I get a flare up and can’t attend <insert event here>?’ ‘What if my friends get mad at me for constantly cancelling on them?’ ‘What if I can’t fulfill the tasks I volunteered for?’ These are all legitimate concerns that people with fibromyalgia have to consider.

And there are more, especially in today’s day and age where we have very few remedies open to us to help with flares. ‘What if my doctor stops giving me the low dose opioid that I take as a last resort?’ Or even, ‘What if my use of Cannabis to help my fibro gets me fired from work?’ (Yes, I live in a state that does have legal Medical Marijuana- but they also still allow people to be fired from work if they use it.)

When you suffer from fibromyalgia, ALL of these things are very possible situations you may face. You have to change your entire life to ensure that you remain as flare-free as possible. It can be done, but not without significant struggles and frustrations as the fibromyalgia flares come without warning, which makes trying to put together some semblance of a life even more precarious.

Have enough of those plausible ‘What ifs’ come in your head come true and the stressors of those situations become palpable. You will have flare ups of pain that make you take sick days, cancel plans with friends or even cancel chores you had scheduled around the house. Friends will get mad or frustrated, things you thought you could handle become overwhelming. And all of this does mess with your mental health. Even the mentally healthiest of individuals are going to start to buckle and start worrying.

And as those worries happen more and more, they turn into anxiety. Soon, you start having full blown panic attacks.

My first fibro-induced panic attack happened about 4 years ago. I did everything I could to push through it, and just keep moving. Since then, I’ve changed my supplement regime, added additional mindfulness practices, prayers, mantras, and used my German Shepherd Natasha as an emotional support animal. Those have all helped, but they are never enough.

Today, as I write this, I’m painfully reminded of how everything I do to prevent anxiety attacks is never enough. Here I am, typing out this post with another full blown panic attack brought on by a fibromyalgia flare. This flare was caused by a significant change in the weather here in the Midwest (a 20 degree increase in heat almost overnight,) and the possibility of a deep friendship with someone I cared about being torn apart because of unsolvable issues (another relationship that had some of it’s issues within the root cause of fibromyalgia).

I’m breathing deeply, made myself a drink (another last resort for me with panic attacks) and am sitting in front of the TV after working in the garden this afternoon, which also helped some. I’ll probably have to use some visualization and breathing techniques to get to sleep tonight, but I’m still pretty certain I can. If needed, I’ll ask the hubby to allow my dog on the bed for the night.

I will want to touch on this subject further, but probably won’t do it until I’m settled some. Until then, if you are reading this and going through any semblance of anxiety or depression over your Fibromyalgia, chronic disease or any other issue, just recognize you aren’t alone. I’m right in the same spot with you. And if I can breathe and push through just this one night of anxiety, you can too.

To be continued.

Cleaning with Fibromyalgia: Tips and Tricks

After talking about how my husband and I continue to adapt to our ever changing schedules and to the fibromyalgia, I thought I’d also share some of the tricks that I’ve figured out over the years to help keep things clean and comfortable in our home.

Don’t look for perfection
This one is hard for me. I admit my obsessive compulsive tendencies make things even more frustrating at times on this issue. If I happen to walk into the house after a hard days work and feel litter under my bare feet, or happen to catch a whiff of a litter box I can go a little crazy. But I have to come to the realization that our house is not dangerous, bacteria isn’t growing in places it shouldn’t be. Our kitchen stays clean and every room is tidy. If people came over unexpectedly (except for Grandma of course), I can be OK with it now.

Write out a Plan where everyone gets a part
Now that he’s back in the office, my husband has a list of chores, and so do I. I do mine immediately after I get home from work so that they are done quickly and I can rest without worrying about more I have to do that night. My husband does his chores in the early morning before I get up, so we aren’t in each other’s way while we are cleaning. I also picked specific chores for him that I wouldn’t mind how he did them. That settled some of my OCD, and allowed him to feel less like he has someone watching exactly how he does something ready to criticize his every move. I also took on chores that I was having a problem with him doing. It meant taking on more strenuous tasks, but I chose that so that I would feel better overall about how the task was done (there will be no litter on the floor if it’s the last thing I do!!)

Allow the Plan to go out the Window
Even though you spent a significant amount of time in this plan and organized everything, expect there to be days when you just can’t get to everything. You come home, and you have NO energy to do anything but rest, and that is OK. Perhaps the vacuuming gets skipped a week, or the dust starts to get a little thick on the shelves. Make sure the basics are taken care of (dishes, clothes for work, you stay as clean as possible) and leave it for the night. There will come a day when you feel good enough to pick up the chore again.

Put a cleaning station on every floor, and in all the bathrooms
A canister of cleanup wipes can go anywhere. I especially have them in every bathroom in our house. If I’m feeling OK in the morning, I’ll pull one out and wipe the sink after I finish getting ready for work. Toilet bowl cleaner and a brush by every toilet helps as well (I don’t do automatics because I’m afraid an animal will drink the water and get sick). You don’t have to scrub with most toilet bowl cleaners. You simply just leave it covering the bowl for 10-15 minutes and most stains will come right out.

Most of the litter boxes in our home are on the second floor, but I used to keep all of the cleaning products just in the kitchen, which forced me to go up and down the stairs, which caused significant pain on flare up days. Now, I have small boxes of trash bags next to each litter box in the house, along with carpet sprays, paper towels and bleach spray. This allows the litter boxes and any sick-ups or other messes to be cleaned up quickly. And having the trash bag means it is very easy to take it out to the bin outside instead of leaving the resulting smelly mess in the main garbage until that became full.

I didn’t stop there with the cleaning stations. I also now have a vacuum on each floor of my home. Now while this sounds like an expensive tip, it doesn’t have to be. The vacuum upstairs is a refurbished model and it works just as well as the one downstairs. But now I don’t have to hike one upstairs every time I vacuum.

Get the extra help from buying the better products
I just purchased a new floor cleaner from Bissell. It has the spinning mop heads. Now instead of getting on my hands and knees to clean up my kitchen and dining room floor, I can easily get out this gadget and let the spinning mop heads clean the hard floors for me. It saves me significant amounts of time as well as energy, since all I have to do is move the cleaner around on the floor.

I also do my best to use the vacuum cleaner on the hard floors instead of manually sweeping with a broom. It may not work as perfectly well as a broom, but it gets my nemesis-cat-litter off the floor so I don’t feel it underfoot, and that is all that matters.

For years I also refused to purchase the swifter dusters. Why spend extra money on a gadget when dusting spray and a cloth would do the same thing? That might be fine, but when you have fibromyalgia, you have to find easier ways of doing things. I purchased my first swiffer duster about two months ago and I am very happy I did. What once took me a half hour is much faster now, especially because it dusts around the few Knickknacks that keep out.

Figure out what you can live without doing
As much as I loved the feeling of the house after spring cleaning was completed, I no longer plan the extravagant spring cleaning weekends that I used to. Last year all of my closets got the spring cleaning treatment. Two years ago it was a complete and total wipe down of the kitchen. This year, spring cleaning has moved into summer and (maybe even) fall cleaning, with the kitchen, basement and garage again on the cleaning hit list. It’s all going to depend on how I feel.

When it comes to fibromyalgia, you have to let how you feel dictate what you are going to do that day. But that doesn’t mean you can’t figure out ways to get what you really want done. It takes a lot of trial and error, and maybe a little bit of leeway about what doesn’t have to be perfect. And even though it’s a lot of work, and there are still days I have to push myself, I’m still pretty proud of how my home looks.

Weekend Win

One of the things I really wanted to do here that I had not done on previous blogs was to record some of my wins against Fibromyalgia. This past memorial day weekend, I had two; I was able to run a 5K AND get my gardens planted.

My garden area is a fenced in space within my back yard. The fencing was necessary, as I found out the hard way. We adopted a German Shepherd several years ago and she thought digging in the gardens was just the best thing ever.

Lots needed to be done in order to get them ready to be planted. The whole area had to have the grass cut, the beds themselves weeded, landscaping fabric put down and finally everything planted. It took me two days to get it all done with the rest breaks, but I was happy to see it finished.

After taking a rest day after I got the gardens finished, I tacked the second thing that I wanted to do, which was to run a 5K. I usually do these on a treadmill as it is easier on my joints than running outside. I still do the occasional race outside, but uncontrollable weather means lately I’ve just decided to stay comfortable while trying to keep my distance consistent.

My stats from the app Endomondo for my 5K run

I hadn’t run in two weeks due to a significant pain flare up last weekend, so I didn’t expect to get a full 3.10 miles in. However, after I started running, I felt comfortable enough to give the full distance a shot. While slightly less than a 12 minute mile would be slow to some, it’s what I like to average. The speed is much faster than a normal walk, and is easier to maintain for me with less effort. That means I may in time be able to run longer distances again by slowly working up my endurance at slower speeds.

Today I’m a bit sore from all the work that I did. My hips, legs, shoulders and knees are complaining a little more loudly than they normally do. But overall, it was SO worth it!