Be Your Own Advocate

A chronic pain scale

Unfortunately there are some certainties in this life that sufferers of chronic illness have to face. From facing employers who do not have equitable work policies to dealing with healthcare providers who just really don’t. know what is going on with our bodies, it’s enough to want to make you cry. I know I have at times.

But it’s because we have these things to contend with that makes what I am about to say even more important. Yes, there will feel like there are times when we are the victim of our illnesses, and we have to allow ourselves to grieve for things that are no longer open to us. But then, regardless of whether or not we have a caregiver in our lives, we must become our own advocate and learn to fight for the things that we know we need.

This doesn’t mean we are going to get everything we advocate for, But with enough thought, data collection and learning to understand what you can and cannot get, you can be surprised at what can go your way.

Understanding Your Energy Use

For the first several years of my illness, I still tried to push myself to do some of the things that I had done before the full onset of my symptoms. And while I did have some accomplishments, most of them put me in bed for days afterward. I realized that some of my issue was that I had no idea what I was capable of; I simply pushed through any pain and uncomfortable, thinking I it wouldn’t cause any repercussions. I was wrong.

Figuring out what I could and couldn’t do took a lot of time. And I’m still doing it, 7 years later. I had to start from the very beginning by giving myself time to do the bare minimum; work, food, hygiene and some cleaning of the house, and basic cooking. After awhile, I realized that I did have some energy for other things on certain days, so I started scheduling a little more on those days. But I still kept at least one day a week to do the bare minimum (and still do). By tuning into my body, I was able to better understand what energy I needed, where I could become more efficient and where I needed to spend more time. And I also figured out the warning signs of when I was about to put myself into a flare, which was crucial to understand.

Get your Medical Information Documented

This sounds like it’s a no-brainer, but I’m still surprised at how much I think I’ll remember about my medications, only to not be able to give that information to a healthcare professional when asked. I now carry a list of my meds in my bullet journal so that it can be pulled out when needed.

But medications aren’t the only medical information we should be tracking. If we can’t effectively communicate things like pain types and pain levels to healthcare professionals, we will never be able to allow them to help us properly. I will never forget the times when I worked in an ER triage and saw a nurse’s frustration at working with a pain patient. She she would ask how bad something hurt on a scale of 1 to 10, many patients would simply say 11. While that response gives adequate information about how upset the patient is at their own pain, it doesn’t do much to help someone understand what they are going through. A pain scale with descriptions can be very helpful in that situation, and can be printed out and kept with your list of medications. That way you can read the description along with the number, which allows more understanding about the state you are in.

Prepare to be Your Own Caregiver

I wish everyone who has chronic illness the best caregivers they can have. Really. Although I’m very lucky to have a good caregiver and can usually effectively communicate my needs to him, there are many times when the level of pain that I’m at doesn’t allow me to tell him what I need, or he’s in the middle of work or possibly not at home when I’m flaring. It’s in the cases where he’s not available or when I can’t tell him that I need something that I have to fight my body to get whatever it is that I need or want to be more comfortable. And I don’t wish that fight on anyone.

But, the fight to take care of yourself in flare ups does happen. And because it does, being prepared is huge. To get prepared, I thought about my last flare up and thought about what I used. I needed extra blankets and pillows, wanted a bag of popcorn for comfort, and wanted to watch some mindless TV shows. I now have extra blankets and pillows downstairs as well as up, have saved some seasons of shows for flares, and I also have a stash of medications near my bed with a bottle of water just in case I can’t make it downstairs. That way it won’t be so hard to fight to get the things I need should the hubby be away.

I know I’ve just scratched the surface here. There are many other things that you can do to make things easier on yourself when medical issues rear their ugly head, and my plan is to talk more about this soon. But I think the biggest thing that I want to get across, especially to those who may not feel like they have the support that they need, is to be that advocate for yourself. Know what your limits are. Have things written down and available in a purse or bag. Keep things ready when flareups strike. I know for many of us thinking of ourselves is hard to do, especially when we have jobs, families and homes to take care of. But we cannot take care of those things if we don’t put in the time to take care of ourselves first. And the sooner we learn this lesson, the sooner we can work to get back to some semblance of a normal life.

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