Living with Fibro: About that Exercise Stuff…

In my last post, I talked about all of the exercise that I was trying to do with fibromyalgia. I’ll admit, it was a lot. And I also admit, I didn’t do much of it without a struggle.

But the struggle became too much.

First, let me come clean. There was one part of my exercise routine that I didn’t mention in my previous post. I do a five minutes stretching routine every day. It is one designed by Joe Yoon from his better stretching book, and hits a majority of the muscle groups all at once. I also add a wide legged forward bend with an arm stretch into the mix to help keep in place two pesky ribs that like to cause extra pain. The entire routine is about 6 minutes long. It’s quick, easy, and doesn’t place extra strain on any joints. So it shouldn’t be a big deal to do it, right?

Well, not if you have fibromyalgia.

The extra six minutes of stretching means that is less energy I have for my day at work, any chores that I have to do throughout the day or to help me deal with any stressful issues that come up. It also means that I don’t have that extra energy for walks in the cold or to do strength training. What I didn’t realize is that 6 minutes meant that I was starting to borrow energy from the next day in order to get through the current day. I was making a personal energy deficit 6 minutes at a time. This is the type of deficit that only 16 hours in bed would be the only thing to help me get out of.

I didn’t get to the point of 16 hours in bed at least (only 13), but I got the message. If I really wanted to keep 6 minutes of daily stretching in my routine, something had to give. So I chose to get rid of my weekly elliptical training. I also chose not going out in the freezing cold to walk my dog. My dog isn’t happy (and neither is the hubby since now I pester him to walk her), but I really have no other choice. I have to keep moving or else I will tighten up to the point where I’m going to need to rely on my husband a lot more than I do now because I won’t be able to move very easily. Further, I have to choose what is the best thing to spend my energy on, and staying indoors won out.

So I am writing about my mistake here in the hopes that it helps others understand. At the very least, if you get anything out of this post, please understand this: Just because someone with fibromyalgia can do things one week, it doesn’t mean they can do the exact same routine the next. They may have to think on other factors like weather, stress levels, current environment, what specific chores are needed, what tasks are needed at work and many other things to ensure they get done what they need to do. In fact, they may have to totally rearrange what their schedule will look like based on all of those factors, much like I did here. This isn’t a disease that acts a certain, routine way. Instead, it literally is waging war on you. Depending on what you do and what your environment looks like, you can win against it, or it could win against you, and the battles shift very quickly between those two opposites.

So what am I going to do now? Since I feel the running and strength training on the TRX are most important, I have decided to cut all work on the elliptical for now. That energy can then be utilized for the full body stretching. And as much as I really miss the walking trails near my home, I will be staying in for the next week and a half at least. All my walks will be on the treadmill. I can’t spend the energy both dealing with the cold, fighting ice and walking.

I am hoping that I won’t have to do any more changes to my exercise. The big test to see whether that is true or not is this Sunday morning; my planned 5K on the treadmill. If I can get through it without pain, I’ll know that I’m on the right track. If I can’t, then I will need to cut something else back in my exercises, or reformat my strength training. And, I’ll have to honestly answer the same question that brings fear to my heart; ‘Am I simply still trying to do too much?’

While the question I may have to ask is scary, I have still learned something through this process. I’ve learned to listen more deeply to my body to understand the difference between having sore muscles, and having your muscles so tired that you aren’t healing properly between workouts. It’s a more important situation that I originally gave it credit for. Here’s to hoping I don’t make the same mistake again.

But that being said, I’m not going to stop dreaming about being an athlete, at least in some form.

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