Living with Fibro: Sleep

It occurred to me that when people ask what fibromyalgia is like, the answers that they receive can be very general, pending on how the person afflicted with the disease is feeling that day. That person may or may not start to detail the challenges that we face on a daily basis. So because of this, I’d like to start 2021 out with a series of blog posts that describe how a typical day in the life of a fibromyalgia/CFS sufferer would look. In this first post, I’d like to discuss what a typical night of sleep is for me, as well as talk about how it is for me to get up in the morning. When reading, keep in mind that although my story is typical, it is not going to be exactly the same for all fibro sufferers, especially those who have additional fibro symptoms or other illnesses to contend with on top of the fibromyalgia.

Prepping for Bed
I know it sounds funny, but yes, I do ‘prep’ for bed. Depending on whether or not the fibromyalgia is flaring, and what the time of year it is, I have several go-to pajamas I can use. I have joggers (sweat pants with elastic cuffs at the ankles), and 3 nightgowns that I either wear with or without the joggers. All of the items are the softest ones that I can find, with the gowns being various sizes so that if I have tactile issues, I can pick one that is more fitted so that I’m not dealing with a wrinkle that wakes me up in the middle of the night.

Having multiple pillows and blankets are a must. Right now I get by with having 2 full size pillows and three smaller ones. The larger are for my head and in case I need to have pillows between my knees while laying on my side, and the smaller ones are to ‘brace’ my body should I have to deal with extra pressure from the mattress on one of my joints. I usually start the night using only one or two pillows, but may end up using more should a sharp pain in a joint jolts me awake.

Finally, I have a variety of foam earplugs in my bedside drawer. the slightest noise from my husband or the dog will also wake me up, so the earplugs are a must. Unfortunately I can’t use them all the time as my ears get sore from them, but when I can use them, they are a Godsend.

Sleeping Through the Night
The nights go one of three ways: Either I sleep like a log, I toss and turn the entire night, or it’s a combination of the two. If I’m sleeping like a log, it means that I probably took some pain medication in order to allow my body to sleep. And while I prefer to sleep deeply like this, it also has it’s consequences (as you will see later).

At least one night a week I toss and turn the entire night, regardless of whether or not I have taken medication. It’s these nights that are the hardest, because it could be caused by a multitude of reasons. I do toss and turn for some general reasons, like stuff going on in my head, being sick, dealing with allergies, having a flare or the hubby needing to get up or change positions. However, thanks to fibromyalgia, I can also toss and turn for some really crazy reasons. It could be because the fitted sheet isn’t properly on the mattress, and I’m laying on a wrinkle from the sheet or my pajamas. Last night, there were even wrinkles on the sheet that was laying on top of my feet and legs, and the skin in those areas started to hurt. I’ve been jolted awake by my legs and arms going to sleep, even though I was sleeping on my back with my arms at my sides. I’ve also been jolted awake because of the elastic in my underwear has become uncomfortable. Other reasons I could wake up include a new pressure point from my fingers, hips, knees and feet laying a certain way. I could even start to have a flare up due to my body being too cold or hot, or because of a weather change. Regardless of the reason, during these these nights I usually only get 3 or 4 hours of sleep.

A majority of nights are mixed. The first 3-4 hours are where I’ll sleep like the dead. Then something will wake me up, and then I’m tossing and turning for the rest of the night. To deal with this tossing and turning, I have 5 different medications at my bedside along with some water. Sometimes I can take a medication and go back to bed, but if there are times when multiple issues are keeping me awake, I have to choose the worst offender and take the medication for that since some of these meds interact and make one or the other ineffective.

Mornings
Mornings are the times when I see the most difference in myself from when I didn’t have fibromyalgia and now. The biggest difference is that every day is much more of a struggle to get up than it used to be. If I have slept very deeply, I will wake up and not be in pain for the first moment or two upon waking. But the minute I move, the pain becomes excruciating. Every joint, bone and muscle scream at me all at once because I dare trying to wake them from such a deep sleep. The more I toss and turn at night, the less excruciating the pain will be when I wake up. Yes, you read that right, and the issue is very common in fibromyalgia sufferers. The reason it hurts worse when I’m in a deep sleep is that my muscles stay in one position for a prolonged period of time. The longer they stay immobile, the harder it is to move them out of that position. This is one reason why shavasana (the ending corpse pose in yoga) is so hard to get out of after a longer yoga session.

After some of the first pain of the morning subsides and I have gained some movement, I face the trickiest part of the morning, which is taking off the blankets, standing and walking the first few steps. I try to be gentle with myself while I do this piece, but I must confess that it’s a fight each and every morning with myself due to the pain, because it’s multiple types of pain all at once. The difference in temperature from the removal of covers causes tactile pain, the swinging my legs off the side of the bed hurts my muscles and joints, and finally putting weight on my feet makes me feel like they ‘scream’ as they start to bear weight, and it makes it hard not to cuss for those first several steps.

This wave of morning pain will last about 10 minutes. Sometimes it’s longer should the weather be really cold, or if the ceiling fan in my bedroom is on. It is because of this last round of morning pain that I no longer schedule any exercise in the mornings. I also find that having to do any immediate decision making (like picking out clothes) or putting together any collection of items that I need for the day is incredibly difficult. So I try to get all of that done the night before if at all possible. I also don’t allow my husband to attempt to wake me anymore. Even though he means well, I’m afraid I’ll simply scream and cuss at him, and he doesn’t deserve that treatment, regardless of how much pain I’m in.

So that is as far as I want to discuss for this post. I hope that there will be those that read it and realize that there truly is a difference between fibromyalgia and someone with the occasional pain. One of the things that bothers me a great deal is someone without fibromyalgia trying to compare my pain with their arthritic hands, bum knee or the pain they still have from an old joint injury. They are not one and the same. Everything I’ve written about up here is something I have to prepare and deal with almost every damn day. I’m not saying your pain isn’t something that needs to be considered, but ultimately, this disease is so much more complex than people realize, and your bum knee or your old injury doesn’t compare.

For those reading this who don’t have the disease, I think the best advice I can give to you when dealing with a fibro sufferer is to give them space to talk about their pain. Don’t compare it with your own, simply listen to them and ask them what they need. Ask them if you can help. Just because we may look like we are feeling OK doesn’t mean that we truly are. And even if we don’t need the help at the time, we will feel we are being heard and supported – something most fibro sufferers desperately need.

Thanks for reading.

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